Screencast: Evernote as a Medical Student’s Peripheral Brain

In this video, 4th-year medical student Ryan MacDonald demonstrates how he uses Evernote as his “medical peripheral brain.”

So cool. 🙂

5 thoughts on “Screencast: Evernote as a Medical Student’s Peripheral Brain

  1. I love this video! I think it's a great demonstration of how students and clinicians can pull together (collect and organize) the most personally useful patient care information to help them at the bedside or office. It's a great demonstration of "information management". I was a little anxious when I saw that (presumably) licensed medical information such as full-text journal articles or parts of articles, and parts of textbooks could be shared with others through a "public" link. Information sharing is a great thing for education and for patient care, but libraries are paying for and licensing this stuff for specific groups of users. Could this kind of sharing be a problem?

  2. This is a great comment and something I have discussed locally with my librarian and looked into a bit. Truly the best way to provide articles to team members is by sending a link to the article on a publisher’s website. This eliminates any concerns vis-a-vis licensing etc. Practically speaking however all the articles I share are shared between colleagues at the same institution which purchases access to these articles. Sharing articles to a broader anynomous Internet audience would be dubious. In the spirit of providing excellent patient care I have virtually no personal issues with sharing papers with my colleagues -provided we are working at the same institution. Additionally I feel it is important to password protect these materials. I understand that this functionality will be available soon.

  3. This is a great comment and something I have discussed locally with my librarian and looked into a bit. Truly the best way to provide articles to team members is by sending a link to the article on a publisher's website. This eliminates any concerns vis-a-vis licensing etc. Practically speaking however all the articles I share are shared between colleagues at the same institution which purchases access to these articles. Sharing articles to a broader anonymous Internet audience would be dubious. In the spirit of providing excellent patient care I have virtually no personal issues with sharing papers with my colleagues -provided we are working at the same institution. Additionally I feel it is important to password protect these materials. I understand that this functionality will be available soon.