Jul 31

Health Media CSE from Hunter College

Shawn McGinniss at Hunter College let me know that Hunter’s Health Professions Education Center created a Google Custom Search Engine for searching out “health-related videos and other interactive media.”

You can try it here.

According to the CSE’s main page:

Since many educational organizations and media outlets now host full-length content online, this custom search engine aims to make it easier to find quality educational content for students, faculty, and service providers in the health professions. Our goal is to quickly and efficiently locate videos, documentaries, podcasts, lectures, interactive flash content, and other educational media. Targeted topics include nursing, public health, medicine, physical therapy, nutrition, HIV/AIDS, epidemiology, medical lab sciences, communication sciences, psychology, etc.

Shawn also allowed me to post this list of the sites the CSE searches [XML] so you can see what sites his CSE searches. This allows you to not only build on or refine his work for your own purposes, but to suggest additional resources to Shawn (having checked that his CSE isn’t already searching ‘em).

If you like, you can add this CSE to your iGoogle.

Jul 30

Family Practice POC Web Geekery

University of Wisconsin Department of Family Medicine physician Derek Hubbard, MD instructs family doctors on how to find clinical information [on the Web] at the point of care.

There are definitely some good tips for clinicians here, but a couple that make me a little uneasy (like using info from About.com as a patient handout).

Dr. Hubbard might also be interested in using the Consumer Health and Patient Education Search Engine.

[Hattip: Ratcatcher]

Jul 29

“Article of the Future”

Cell Press and Elsevier have launched a project called Article of the Future [link] that is an ongoing collaboration with the scientific community to redefine how the scientific article is presented online. The project’s goal is to take full advantage of online capabilities, allowing readers individualized entry points and routes through the content, while using the latest advances in visualization techniques. We have developed prototypes for two articles from Cell to demonstrate initial concepts and get feedback from the scientific community.

Craig Stoltz may be more impressed with these than I am, but he asks an interesting question:

WHY IN HOT SCREAMING HELL HAVE MAINSTREAM NEWS PUBLISHERS NOT DEVELOPED AN “ARTICLE OF THE FUTURE” BASED ON USE WEB CASES LIKE THIS OVER, OH, I DON’T KNOW, THE LAST 15 YEARS OR SO?

Anyone? Bueller?

Jul 14

Watch Nikki Pound Clinical Reader

When I became aware of Clinical Reader (no linky Google-juice for these guys- you can find ‘em if you want to), I decided just to ignore them. In previous years, I might have enjoyed pointing out various disappointing aspects of the site (I’m a peevish naysayer, it has been said). There was no need, though. There are more really good MedLib bloggers than there once were, some of whom are far better at it than I have ever been.

To my delight, Nicole Dettmar was the one to do it.

http://eagledawg.blogspot.com/2009/07/clinical-reader-starry-ethics-fail.html

To answer Alan’s question: Probably just stupid, but they still deserve a good smacking. Jerks. “Legal ramifications,” my Aunt Fanny.

Moral of the story: Don’t try to intimidate a smart medical librarian- you’ll not only fail, but she’ll make you look *really* stupid for trying.

Go, Nikki!

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EDIT: Yet another reason to love Steve Lawson.