Sep 26

Frankie Dolan at Health 2.0

This shows how far behind I am in my blogging:

My friend (and LibWorm co-creator) Frankie Dolan spoke at Health 2.0 in Paris about MedWorm and I haven’t even posted the video of her talk until now. BAD David. Video is embedded below.

Frankie’s bit starts at about 10m 25s if you’d like to skip up to it.

:)

Sep 24

P Younger: “Beyond Wikipedia: how good a reference source are medical wikis?”

(Paula Younger is Electronic Resources Librarian, Exeter Health Library, Exeter, UK.)

Abstract:
Purpose – - The purpose of this paper is to examine the case for using subject (medical) wikis as a reference tool.Design/methodology/approach – The paper summarises content of ganfyd and WikiMD, comparing their ethos and approach to information. It describes some other medical and health wikis in brief.Findings – As their audience is somewhat more specialised, medical wikis, currently in their infancy, cover topics in more depth than Wikipedia but coverage remains patchy. They may be of particular use for those without access to expensive resources such as UpToDate requiring a short literature review or overview of a topic. Wikis at present are best used as a signpost to other resources with tighter editorial control.Research limitations/implications – The assessment of the subject wikis is brief and the analysis of wikis as a reference tool is largely drawn from general literature, not medical.Practical implications – This assessment provides exposure of subject wikis as a potential reference tool.Originality/value – The paper highlights the existence of subject wikis as a potential more in-depth tool than Wikipedia.

Links:
[Emerald]
[Ingenta]

Sep 20

Looking for mobile-friendly, authoritative texts and databases? There’s a librarian for that.

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2010/08/mobile-friendly-librarian-suggested-apps/
By: Susan M. Foster-Harper, MLS, AHIP

Excerpt:

As a medical librarian, I like seeing what’s coming at me. On one side, books and biomedical literature are quickly transitioning to an electronic format. Vendors and publishers are presenting new products to improve access.

On the other, iTunes and mobile devices are rapidly becoming ubiquitous. Many of the apps in the Medical category of the Apps Store have proven extremely useful to medical students and healthcare professionals in a clinical environment, i.e., Epocrates, Medscape, Lexi-Comp, iTranslate among others. To students and residents, the speed and immediacy of the information can be exhilarating by the end of a busy day.

Sep 18

Searching PubMed on a Mobile Device

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a919474140

Abstract:

An increasing number of students and faculty come to campus with an iPhone or iPod touch. Aside from recreational use, these devices can be used to search for medical literature, but picking the right applications for searching can be difficult. A comparison test was created to find the best application for searching PubMed from an iPhone or iPod touch. The products tested were PubSearch, PubMed on Tap, and PubMed for Handhelds. Although equally accurate, PubMed on Tap was the superior product due to its simple method for limiting by date and its readily accessible e-mail feature.

Yup. That’s pretty much what I said in the MLA Webcast.

Sep 17

Android for Healthcare

http://www.linuxfordevices.com/c/a/News/Dell-Streak-and-Sprint-Evo-4G-with-Calgary-ResolutionMD/

This fall, hospitals and physicians will be able to order Dell’s five-inch Dell Streak Android 2.1-based mini-tablet as an option with Dell’s healthcare solutions, says the company. The device will be loaded with client apps designed to interact with Dell’s EMR and MCC (mobile clinical computing) enterprise software, providing healthcare professionals with digitized patient information, says the company.

While Dell is targeting its Streak tablet at EMR applications, Sprint is aiming its HTC-manufactured Evo 4G Android smartphone more specifically at mobile medical imaging in a partnership with Calgary Scientific. An Android version of the latter’s HIPPA-compliant ResolutionMD Mobile software, said to be “powered by PureWeb,” will be offered on the Evo 4G.

Sprint, meanwhile, has developed a secure platform for ResolutionMD and other medical imaging applications that spans its wireline IP network, as well as 3G and 4G wireless networks, says the carrier.

More:
http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-Wireless/Dell-Android-Streak-Tablet-to-Get-Healthcare-Industry-Integration-292890/

Sep 16

Ashley Julian at Trent and Company

[Ashley responded! see update here]

Maybe it isn’t fair to pick on Cision quite so much. After all, there are lots of other spammers who don’t even respond to my polite requests asking to be removed from their distribution lists.

One of my least favorite of these is Ashley Julian at Trent and Company.

ashley@trentandcompany.com
nancy@trentandcompany.com

(Nancy is the President of this firm and can also be reached at 212-966-0024. Anyone have an auto-dialer I can borrow?)

If you’d like to make me smile, please send these two some email? Thanks!

Sep 16

Nice Review of Our Book!

http://radiology.rsna.org/content/256/1/63.extract

Herein lays the major accomplishment of this fine easy-to-use reference: allowing the reader to more easily and efficiently navigate through some of today’s most useful Internet tools. The book details ways to maximize the efficiency of Internet search engines and tools that allow the busy health care provider to find, manage, and organize the information that they need in a timely fashion. To this end, the authors have done a spectacular job.

This well-planned concise reference book is well organized, with an ample table of contents. The individual chapters contain numerous boxes that contain short key highlights. An adequate number of schematics, most referencing variations of an advanced Google search, make correlation between the text and actual Internet usage more user friendly. While the title implies that this fine book might be most suited for physicians, Internet Cool Tools for Physicians is equally applicable to numerous other groups including, but not limited to, information technology and picture archiving and communication system personnel, nurses, medical researchers, basic scientists, and medical students, as well as undergraduates who are interested in health care professions. In fact, the fi rst seven chapters are so broad in context that any modern-day user of the Internet would most certainly benefit from this book.

Thanks, Dr. Stoffey!

[Book available here]

Sep 16

Dear Cision…

To the folks at Cision-

I receive a HUGE amount of unsolicited email (aka SPAM, UBE or UCE) in which I have no interest. This SPAM is problematic for me because I am a busy person with many things to do. Wading through this dreck to get to information I actually want takes up far too much of my valuable time.

An impressive proportion of this SPAM comes from your clients with a link to your site at which I can “opt out” of receiving future emails from that client.

Here’s the automated response your clients will receive when I get email from them through your services:


It is bad enough to receive unsolicited bulk email, but getting it from a Cision client is especially unpleasant.

Yours is only one of far too many organizations who send me emails like this. In order to “opt out” (which is an odd term because I never “opted in”) of emails from EACH of Cision’s clients, I have to click on a link in the email. This wouldn’t be so awful if:

1. …I had “opted in”
2. …Cision allowed me to “opt out” of emails from ALL their clients at once. They don’t. I have to “opt out” of email from each one of their clients.
3. …Cision offered contact information at their site where I could directly express these concerns to them.

Since none of these things is true, I urge you to take up this issue with Cision. I also urge you to either stop using bulk email entirely or at least use it much more selectively. If you had ever taken 2 minutes to look at my blog, you’d see that your message is a poor fit for my little site.

Sincerely,

-David L. Rothman
http://davidrothman.net

This email is an automated response. I have not seen your email, nor will I ever see any email sent to me by a Cision system.

Since you offer no universal “opt-out” nor information on how to reach you and request to be removed from your database, I’m hoping this post might reach you somehow. If it doesn’t, you’re not very good at what you claim to do.

While you operate as a supposedly reputable company providing a valuable marketing service, I think you no better than the spammers who send me unsolicited email offering products that claim to alter the size or function of sexual organs.

Please, be better than them and let people like me choose to stop being harassed by people like you.

Most sincerely,

-David Rothman

[UPDATE]

Well, it worked. Received this email:


from Libby vanBuskirk to David Rothman
date Thu, Sep 16, 2010 at 4:32 PM
subject Removal from Cision
mailed-by cision.com
4:32 PM (30 minutes ago)

Hello Mr. Rothman,

I work for Cision, the media research company based in Chicago. In response to your blog post, I just wanted to let you know that we have removed your name and contact information from our database. I sincerely apologize for the problems this listing has caused you.

Thank you,
____________________________________________
Libby vanBuskirk
Supervisor, Internet Media

CISION US, INC.
332 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60604
Direct: 312-873-6644
Main: 1-866-639-5087

Email: Libby.vanBuskirk@cision.com

So if you get an absurd number of these emails, Libby may be the person to contact.

Now they need to make it possible for recipients to remove themselves without having to resort to this sort of public shaming.

[/UPDATE]