Oct 30

Slides: NAHSL 2010

Thanks again to the organizers and participants of NAHSL 2010 for inviting me to speak! Newport is lovely and I had a very nice time.

[Slides embedded below]

[Slides embedded above]

As usual, my favorite thing about the event was the people I got to meet. FINALLY met Margo Coletti. I got to meet and chat with Lee Rainie (from whom I learned the word “tweckle”). I was delighted to meet Barbara Davis, who made this trip so delightfully easy and pleasant.

Another memorable moment was meeting Jeanie Vander Pyl of the Cape Cod Hospital Library. We had a brief correspondence in April 2009 that gave me a lasting case of warm fuzzies and reminded me how much I like the cooperative habits of so many librarians. It was a real treat to meet her in person and thank her for that.

Oct 26

Mocking Snake Oil: Alternative Therapy Flowchart

Crispian Jago writes:

“Believe it or not, I don’t really have a particular interest in alternative therapies, I just can’t help picking at the scabs of alt-med credulity.

However, if perchance you are a little disillusioned with allopathy, here’s a handy little flowchart to help you find the ideal alternative therapy to meet your needs.”


(Click for full-size image)

Oct 22

Melissa Rethlefsen’s Continued Awesomeness

I’d have given anything to see this presentation given. It may not interest you if you’re not a medlib person interested in publishing (or if you don’t know me or Melissa), but I grinned my way through the slides as they show the path to the creation of the book.

Then there’s this recent presentation of Melissa’s on mobile health tech for the Midwest Chapter of the Medical Library Association in Madison, WI in September that contains lots of consumer applications I know nothing about:

That’s especially timely, given Pew’s recent report.

Melissa is awesome. She even let me come to her wedding, where we took these photobooth shots:
David and Melissa
(Click for larger version)

Oct 12

MCMLA 2010 slides

Thanks so very, very much to MCMLA for inviting me to speak at their annual meeting last week- it was loads of fun.

Attendees: If you would like more information on the topics covered that are not addressed in the slides below, please email me- my email address is in the sidebar of this blog.

It was especially great to meet fun people like Cam Gentry, Kristin Sen, and Lynne Fox- and I got to pester T. Scott Plutchak with questions about his views on publishing until I finally think I understand where he’s coming from. I think I understand now why he says:

“Open access week is coming up. Here’s what I wish librarians would do — if you really care about advancing the openness of scholarship, make a commitment to go to at least one publishers conference or meeting in the next year. Introduce yourself to somebody other than your sales rep. Go have a cup of coffee or a drink. Ask them about what they see as the future of scholarly publishing. And then listen.”

Oct 09

SpamWars: Update on Ashley Julian / Trent and Company

You may remember this post in which I complained about excessive spam from Cision (and it worked), or this post about Ashley Julian at Trent and Company.

Got an email from Ashley today (23 days after my post went up and months after I sent her multiple polite emails asking her to stop spamming me):

From: Ashley Julian [ashleynjulian@gmail.com]
Date: Sat, Oct 9, 2010 at 12:19 PM
Subject: Emails
To: David Rothman

Dear Mr. Rothman -

I am writing from my personal email to let you know that I have removed you from all of my contact lists. I sincerely apologize for the inconvenience I have caused you and I assure you that you will never hear from me again. I would like to ask if it would be possible for you to remove your entry about me from your blog. As I am sure you can understand, I do not want this to be something that immediately comes up when my name or my company is Googled.

Again, my sincerest apologies.
Ashley

Ashley, if you don’t want to be called out in public for rude behavior…maybe you should end the behavior. I DO understand why you don’t want people stumbling across the post. Do YOU understand that your practices are rude and unacceptable?

No, I will not remove the post.

I will, however, vow not to send repeated, unsolicited emails to your personal email account and ignore your polite requests that I stop.

THAT, I think, is fair.

Oct 06

Are you going to the MCMLA 2010 Annual Meeting?

I’m speaking at MCMLA 2010 this weekend and just now realizing that I’m not sure I’ll know a soul there.

So that I don’t feel like the new kid at school who has nowhere to sit in the cafeteria at lunch, drop me an email if you’re going to be there? I’d also like to pick your brain a bit as I finish polishing my presentation. My email address is shown in the sidebar of this blog.

Thanks!

Oct 04

Toss out your answering machine

(This may be seen as off-topic for some readers, but I’m writing about it as an example of technology simplifying my life.)

I’ve been slowing realizing over the last several months that neither Liz nor I religiously check our home answering machine. This is bad, because there may be important messages.

We both, however, check our email religiously. I was convinced there was a better way for us to manage the calls to our home that we missed. Eventually, I realized that Google Voice would work quite nicely. Here’s what I did:

In Google services:

1. Set up a new Gmail account.

2. Signed up for Google Voice and chose a number that is local for us.

3. In Settings > Phones, I turned OFF all phones (DEselected the check boxes)…so that none of the phones associated with the account would ring when this number was called. This means that all calls to this number would, by default, go straight to voicemail.

4. In Settings > Voicemail & Text, I recorded a new greeting appropriate for our home phone and set it as the default greeting for all calls.

5. In Settings > Voicemail & Text >Voicemail Notifications, I set notifications to be sent to the account’s Gmail address.

6. I also elected on this screen to have voicemails transcribed. These transcriptions are far from perfect, but they often provide enough information to let us know what should be done with the message.

With my home phone service provider:
(Our home phone provider is Time Warner Cable- they have a VoiceZone service you can sign into to manage these settings yourself. Your provider may or may not have something similar- call them and ask!)

I set calls to forward to my new Google Voice number if we did not answer after four rings:

Back to the new Gmail account:

7. Now that this new Gmail account was receiving emails from Gvoice with the date/time, number, the machine transcription of the message and a link to play the audio, it was time to make sure that Liz and I both got them.

First, I set up all emails from this account to be forwarded to my main email account. Next, I set up a filter to make sure all such emails were forwarded to Liz’s main email account.

So now we were each getting the email when someone called our home phone and left a message.

8. Lastly, I wanted to make sure that neither Liz nor I would accidentally overlook such voicemail-containing emails when we received them, so I made one more filter for each of us that slaps on a big red label:

lastfilter

So here’s what it looks like in my inbox when someone calls our home phone number and leaves a message:
inboxview

The email contains a link to a Web-based audio player through which either one of us can listen to the message if the machine-transcription is insufficient (as it often is).

Results:

1. We can’t fail to notice that we have messages (as we sometimes do now with the little blinking red light on our answering machine).

2. We no longer have to worry about whether one of us or the other has heard a particular message and wonder if it can safely be deleted. We can manage our own listening as we would our own reading. It is as if we are both “cc’d” on voicemails left on our home phone.

3. Neither of us can accidentally delete old messages.

4. We can both easily access our messages anywhere.

5. We’re throwing out our answering machine without having to pay anyone for voicemail service.

:)